Author Topic: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game  (Read 12604 times)

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2012, 10:55:07 PM »
Myself and Nick Walker fought the original WFB battle scenario  with the Dwarves and Greenskinsback in the early eighties. We used an assortment of figures including Chronical band Citadel minatures.  The rocks used by the defenders were , I seem to recollect, plastic oil barrels from my ww2 collection.
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padre

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2012, 09:48:54 PM »
Good to hear, Ant and Damien, that you're interested in playing. I was beginning to think no-one was keen. I will look over my diary and what not and will be in touch to sort a date asap. Was away for a long weekend there, thus my tardiness here.

And yeah, Simon, come along and join in too. You could command some part of the force or help me GM!

Good to know, Doc, that there is someone else out there who has (bizarrely) stayed with the hobby for just as long, and that you too were using unusually sourced scenery and such like. Can't remember the battle scenario, and can't look it up because I don't have my books with me. Was it in the brown and white Forces of Fantasy? I seem to recall the first ed B+W books had an RP scenario (of sorts) in them with a map of a valley with villages and a tower. Will take a look as soon as I can.

padre

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2012, 04:08:48 PM »
Found it, Doc. Page 31 of first book: Ziggurat of Doom, dwarves versus goblins. Forgot all about it, and could only remember the Redwake River Valley RP scenario in the Characters book. Stupid memory.

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2012, 04:21:18 PM »
This is for Ant and Damo. I won't publish this on the bigger forums 'cos I am not sure I should. The readers will learn about the rules from the Bat Rep instead.

Basic Rules Outline, including Forces of Fantasy amendments and additions.

GM invents plot (done!) and sets up battlefield.

The Turn
Movement phase - Active player moves (including any chargers)
Shooting phase - Active player shoots
Combat phase – All opposing troops fight
Second movement phase - Active player moves units who didn’t fight, but not within 4” of enemy
Magic Phase - Active player
Rout Phase – All routers move, and Any can try to rally

Movement
Half movement penalties for difficult ground and crossing obstacles
Double movement for charges and countercharges and running away

Units can Wheel (move as per outermost figure) or Turn (lose half a move) or expand/contract frontage by up to 4 models if moving (no penalty), 8 models if stationary.

Psychology
Hatred means always going towards or charging the hated foe
Fear tests (D6 tables) whenever want to fight/charge or shoot at fear-causing, or shot at/charged by feared foe
Terror test (2D6 table) whenever terror causer within 15”
Frenzy, D6 test when want to go into frenzy
Stupidity, D6 test start of every turn

Morale
Modified checks taken whenever fall below half strength, equal sized friend routs within 15”, army leader/king is killed, or an individual wounded. DMs for various things, like being close to the army leader etc.

Shooting
Just about same as today. Shoot in one rank, skirmishers in two. Individuals within 5” of unit only engaged at short range. BS6+ models can return fire.

Combat
Pretty much as today. No arcs mentioned for chargers, and no rules that cannot manoeuvre during a charge. Initiative order of attacks, second attack at one less Initiative (etc). Various weapons differentiations affect Initiative, To Hit and To Kill. ‘Kills’ count as ‘Wounds’ against multiple wounds monsters, and Forces of Fantasy adds modifications to do with defended obstacles.

If lose combat (simply wounds comparison) then pushed back. After so many push backs, rout – though different races last different number of push backs. When rout, enemy gets free blow, and another if they pursue and catch.

Critical Hits
Individual can try to do this – a way of removing all wounds from a multi-wound foe.

Knock Out or Fighting Defensively
Other possible ploys for a character instead of killing.

Leadership
Modifies Fear, Terror, Hatred rolls, and Morale tests.

Mounted troops
Specialised rules for smaller games (les than 50 models) so we won’t be using them. Or maybe we’ll use them for the heroes? To do with rider and mount being separate.

Base sizes
All my models have standard size bases. If they were larger they’d be skirmish, smaller would be shock. We have no skirmishers or shock troops.

Magic
Spells might need time to prepare and time to rest afterwards, sometimes require talismans, they use up Constitution/Energy Points (so none left means no more spells). Other wizards can try to annihilate magical attacks against him. Wounded Wizards can fumble spells.

padre

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2012, 04:23:20 PM »
As for dates, first batch ....

Saturdays 1st, 15th or 22nd September

Any good?

Ant

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2012, 05:26:03 PM »
Not the 1st alas
I'll check on the others

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2012, 06:43:40 PM »
Hi - I'm am currently free on all three dates and happy to help.
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damo_b

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2012, 08:26:52 PM »
just 22nd for me.busy on the other dates

padre

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2012, 08:01:04 PM »
Can you do the 22nd Antonio?

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2012, 08:57:07 PM »
Massive thank you to Simon, Damien and Ant for going back in time with me. :D It was a great day, and will stand out from the thousands ... nay, hundreds ... of other wargames I have engaged in. Actually, could it be thousands? Hmm. I wonder.

Anyhoo - the report begins ...

The Battle, Part One

(Author’s Note: Due to the nature of this project I was going to write this purely as a description of the game and rules, but all three players asked me to write it in my usual ‘story’ style, putting game notes in italics. All three said they don’t read dice-roll and measurement style reports. So I have bowed to their collective wisdom (might have made a basic error there! ;)) and will proceed accordingly.)

As the sun rose in the sky that morning, the valley in which the Tower of Baal stood was quiet.



Yet beyond the western slope all was haste and activity as King Rathard’s army marched as fast as their legs (or their mount’s legs) would carry them. The king had ordered that they must reach the valley as early as possible in the day, thus the army had decamped and begun its advance shrouded in darkness. Knowing the nature of their foe meant this was a frightening time, for the dark was to the undead what daylight was to the living, and so when the dawn came a cheer went up from the army. Less than an hour later they had arrayed themselves and advanced in line over the western shoulder of the valley.

(Note: As per the modified rules for the scenario, 4D3 determined the turns of daylight remaining, during which the undead would be subject to instability – 9. After this would be two more turns of twilight during which battle could continue but the undead would not be unstable, and then darkness would fall and the battle would surely end. So, an 11 turn game then.)

King Rathard rode almost at the centre of the army, and almost directly in front of the Tower of Baal. Baron Clarynn and a company of his mounted men at arms rode behind the king’s noble guard. Nearly all of the king’s own footsoldiers (both his men at arms and one of his longbow regiments) were upon his majesty’s flanks.



(Note: With deployment anywhere up to 6” from the player’s table edge, the first edition rules didn’t really allow for any depth. As to why the longbow on the far right of the picture are apparently 10” in I have no idea. No-one noticed on the day, so I reckon no-one noticed in our fictional 1984. Or, maybe, no-one cared – it looked right and they were still a long way from the tower.)

The longbow had been ordered to head towards some high ground near the centre of the field from where they might pour arrows upon whosoever they wishes, while out on the very right flank of the army the other of his longbow regiments had been ordered to take advantage of the high ground there right from the initial deployment.



To their left and below them, the baron’s second body of riders trotted forwards, slowed momentarily by his regiment of light spearmen. The Baron’s two large regiments of armoured spearmen flanked the King’s main battalion. The Wizard Raccaltacc had decided to advance very cautiously indeed and so rode forwards alone, hidden by a covering copse of trees which he intended to creep through and have a look at the situation at the tower before deciding exactly what to do.



To his left the Baron’s archers marched in their cheap tunic of undyed wool, while upon the wizard’s right there was the loud fluttering long banner belonging to the King’s more rustic soldiers.

Master Hobollig commanded his forces as best he could to array for battle. The goblins, typically, proved somewhat wilful and contrary in their ways, either forgetting or ignoring some of his commands. Whichever it was, the necromancer was already wondering if he might regret employing such base creatures for his army. In fact it occurred to him in a moment of madness (or clarity) that if he had poisoned their beer the night before he could perhaps now – with the power of the magical stone within the Tower of Baal – have been commanding an equal sized army of zombies, which may well have improved their ability to follow orders.

(Note: The evil forces were divided between Damien and Simon, who both played the role of 14 year olds from 1984 very well indeed. I myself congratulated them on their authentically stupid arguments several times, especially the way Damien, who commanded the undead, mimed going for the goblin general’s throat every time Simon turned his back.)



Hobollig found himself outside of his tower arraying his forces when the enemy marched over the hill in to the valley. (Note: The GM hadn’t thought about that when he set up the scenery, and the 6” deployment meant no-one could start in the tower. If a player had asked to do so, for common sense reasons, Eddie would have allowed it, but the players in question were too busy arguing about deploying over the line that had been agreed.)

Most of the skeletons were arrayed on the right flank, with Golgfag’s Ogres very close to the Tower itself. Master Hobollig intended these hulking brutes to stand before the tower and prevent any access. The goblins were massed mostly on the left, with Grom behind them ready to shore up any weak spot that might appear in their lines.

The two little companies of wolf riders took up position on the far, far left, with orders to distract and draw away any forces that might advance up that flank. (Note: The Forces of Fantasy book told Eddie that Red Goblin wolf riders were grouped into little units of 5, so he did so.)



Master Hobollig, standing with his armoured skeleton guard, now turned to look to his left, and wondered whether Golgfag’s impressive warriors could be relied on the hold the tower.



And so the battle was to begin.

[Note: As per the rules we tossed a coin for who got first turn. I was a little bit surprised that in a game of piles of dice they rules said toss a coin. There was a moment’s panic as we realised we might not have an authentic coin and the whole experiment might have to stop there and then, but then I found a penny piece dated 1977 in my pocket and it was ‘GAME ON’)




The Battle, Part 2

King Rathard gave the order to advance cautiously, all the better to assess the disposition and intentions of the foe, as well as to see what might be required to gain access to the tower. Out on the army’s right flank a little more haste was being exhibited as the Baron’s second regiment of riders moved directly towards the two tiny wolf-rider units, who seemed a weak foe indeed to their eyes. Archers and light Spearmen did what they could to keep up.



(Note: This was the first movement phase, another would follow, because everyone was so far from the foe they were thus allowed a second move.)

The Baron trotted forwards behind the King and his knights, still wondering at the King’s supposed wisdom in holding him back until an opportunity arose for him to make a dash for the tower in support of the wizard.



On the other side of the field Master Hobollig’s forced jigged hither and thither into what seemed to them the best form in which to receive the foe, while the Necromancer’s long dead horse warriors came up on the right flank at a pace, perhaps drawn by the weak magical aura emitted by the wizard Raccaltacc (adorned as he was in magical tokens and amulets, with wizardly spells sitting on the very tip of his tongue). Golgfag the mercenary Ogre led his ‘Rutdroggs’ past the tower, the regiment splitting in two then reforming in front of the building. Behind them Master Hobollig fumbled with his keys as he let himself into the tower – he intended to watch the rest of the battle from the comfort of a window seat.



On the wicked army’s left, however, considerably less zeal was being exhibited, as both bodies of wolf riders, very much contrary to their orders, turned about and headed off towards the safety of the rear of the grey stoned farm building.



(Turn 2)

Spurred on by the sight of a foe so easily dismayed as to flee almost before the battle had begun, the Baron’s riders out on the right continued their advance as once more the two foot regiments to their rear did their best to keep up, with some of the longbowmen loosing hurriedly aimed shots at the fleeing wolfriders.



Meanwhile in the centre of the field the King’s first Longbowmen reached the summit of the little hill and immediately set about loosing a volley of arrows at the massed regiment of heavily armoured goblins before them, killing two.



The Baron’s archers also tried a shot at the skeleton riders (Note: As the riders were not yet within 6” they did not yet cause fear, thus no test was necessary in order to shoot at them. Also there was no modifier for moving and shooting, not when you use your own legs anyway!) The archers all then continued their advance (second movement phase).

King Rathard, his white steed’s yellow barding being easily discerned by his soldiers, came on slowly and surely. Upon his majesty’s immediate right was knight keen on hunting with the crossbow. This fellow, who had entered the field with his bow already spanned (Note: An old house rule we always used back in the 80s), let fly with his quarrel yet to no noticeable effect.



Why the death of two plate armoured goblins should so annoy the spear wielding regiment next to them no-one else can ever know, but annoy them it did, for the spear goblins turned and charged smack into the flank of their neighbours …



… killing another two of them.

Note: Failed animosity led to this fight, and the lack of anything akin to charge arcs meant that the angry spear goblins simply turned on the spot and charged. Interestingly it was now that we discovered some text that might well be one of the first Warhammer Fantasy Battle rules contradictions …



RAW thus indicates that the angrier one mob of goblins becomes concerning another mob, the less likely they are to attack. It was obvious that the rules meant for the modifier to be used on the second roll, not the initial one. Also note how the rules go on to explain what happens after a few battles – indicating that these little lead guys are meant to remember grudges from game to game to game! Cool!

While the large foot regiments engaged in their bloody disagreement, the wolf riders scuttled further behind the farmhouse, desperate to hide themselves away from the Baron’s riders. (This was entirely Simon’s decision, as he wanted to role-play what his little guys would be likely to do.)



As the skeleton horse came on, their purple and red banner fluttering as they did so, its sound almost totally lost amongst the sound of cracking, tendon-less joints …



… Master Hobollig, having stood muttering incantations just long enough at the first floor window, cast the ancient spell commonly known as ‘Mystic Mist’.

(The spell needs one movement phase’s worth of rest to cast – he had climbed some stairs in his first movement, but had rested in the second and so could legally cast it. 4 points of Constitution later and the spell is automatically cast. Units within the mist move 1” at random, though we had house rules about units getting out with the aid of members who were already outside!)

The magical mist now formed immediately before the wizard Raccaltracc, its thick miasma extending far enough to cover some of men at arms and archers nearby.



The Wizard Raccalltrac, wholly engulfed in thick, swirling mist, simply chuckled. (As did Ant.) He knew exactly what spell he would cast next.

End of Turn 2. Up to 9 more to go.

Simon

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2012, 12:12:51 PM »
Well done Padre. It was a great day's gaming and I eagerly look forward to the rest of the report.

However, I think it’s quite obvious that the goblin wolf riders were ‘tactically repositioning’ themselves and that any suggestion they were running away is slanderous.
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padre

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2012, 08:08:26 PM »
Oops, got a bit behind here. The next bit was already done (and posted elsewhere) and I am now working on the pics for the bit after that. Here's the bit you want ...

Battle Part 3

(Turn 3)

Most of the King’s army continued their advance, except for the two regiments caught up in the mystic mist with the wizard who halted at Raccaltracc’s command. “Hold fast I pray thee,” he cried, “I shall clear this momentarily.” Thus he began the preparations necessary for the spell he intended to cast.

The bowmen still outside of the mist saw no reason not to shoot, which they did – though to no effect. The longbowmen let loose much more impressive volleys (every man in the regiment on the hill able to shoot) yet between them killed only one goblin.

Then came the wizard’s magical command, summoning a windblast to disperse the magical mist completely. (Note: Eddie the GM decided a magical wind should indeed blow away a magical mist.)

On the other side of the battlefield the goblins continued to act in a typically unhelpful manner, with the wolf riding hero leading his little unit in a brave attack on the rear of the other wolf rider unit. Presumably he did not like them taking the lead and intended to show them what happens when they get in his way.



As a result yet another goblin died to a goblin’s blade! A somewhat more glorious charge occurred on the evil army’s far right flank, as the skeleton riders hurled their mass of bones and rusted armour into the blue liveried spearmen on the hill.



Somehow the spearmen found the courage to stand in the face of this onslaught, even calmly deciding that they would not countercharge as the peak of the hill was a good place to be in a fight.

(Note: The spearmen passed their Terror test with a roll modified with +2 due to their Leadership factor of 4. Skeletons cause Terror when they initially charge or countercharge men. But now another rules conundrum became apparent. Things that cause Terror also cause Fear – in fact so much so that the Fear test is taken with a -1 DM. But if you pass your Terror test on 8+ it says you are ‘uneffected’ (the writer meant unaffected, but this was printed before spell-checking programs). If you are unaffected by Terror then surely the Fear thing doesn’t happen? BUT if you are affected by Terror you run away (either dropping everything as you do so, routing or until you are 2 foot away). So, if you are affected by Terror, Fear tests don’t come into play ‘cos you’re already running - which means the Terror causes Fear rule makes no sense.

We thought perhaps the Terror causes Fear rule was meant to apply when Fear causers push the enemy back, as then the 'afeared' are automatically routed, but as that happens automatically without any die roll then the -1 modifier was still redundant. Once more, the rules left us foundering.

Worse still, the rules say that when you fight an enemy you fear then you suffer a -2 DM to hit. But if you fail a Fear test, you run, or don’t charge in the first place, thus you're not fighting anyway, and otherwise you’re ‘ok’, which makes one doubt the -2 doesn’t apply.

Aaargh!! In all honesty, I think our 2012 mindset was getting in the way –I don’t recall an issue with these tests back in 1984, yet here and now, with experience of 2nd to 8th ed rules, suddenly it all seemed unclear. We were looking for clarification that perhaps would not have occurred to us in the GM-guided games of 1984. ‘Eddie’ simply said he would adjudicate as per individual situations. I do vaguely recall undead being perceived in the mid 80s as very, very hard to beat.
)

The spearmen, their shafts wedged against the ground by their right foot, received the charge as a solid block, killing two of the bony riders. But then the skeleton hero (Note: who was the only one of the four that rolled great stats on the skeleton hero chart – 6 stat lines possible, from truly awful to truly awesome) set about the men with his rusted blade and killed three of them. Thus the men’s courage failed and they broke and fled, pursued by the skeleton riders who failed to inflict more harm on them.



(Note: Combat resolution is based on number of casualties alone, no other factors. You auto flee when Fear causers push you back. Pursuers gain two free blows, one as the enemy breaks, another as they catch up with them. But the riders failed to kill anyone anyway.)

Luckily, what with the King, Baron and the Wizard Raccaltracc being close by (Note: giving morale test modifiers to units within 15”) the other units on that wing of the King’s army did not falter at the sight of the spearmen’s flight, but rather steeled themselves for what they themselves might face.

Once more the King’s army advanced, for the most part cautiously, towards the foe. The woollen clad archers slew two of the armoured skeleton warriors ahead of them, while the two Longbow units combined their efforts to kill two more of the armoured goblins in the centre. Raccaltracc now threw a fireball at the skeleton hero leading the armoured skeletons but failed to fell the ancient warrior, merely burning some mould off his bones. Another spearmen fell to the skeleton horsemen on their heels, after which the undead riders managed to halt their pursuit (Note: Must then spend their next first movement phase reforming their ranks and files, being able to move in the second mvmt phase.)

The goblins’ general animosity towards their own kind was now becoming rife: the plate armoured goblins squabbling amongst themselves (D6 fighting each other!) while the large foot regiment supposedly advancing to protect the army’s left flank now turned about and charged the squabbling wolf-riders in the rear. Three units were thus engaged in fighting not the enemy but each other!



The skeleton archers now felled a mounted man at arms in the Baron’s personal guard, while the Baron’s spearmen continued their flight away from the field of battle.

Still wary of the forces directly defending the tower …



… the right of the King’s army advanced once again in a cautious manner.



But out on the far right, keen not to lose the opportunity presented to them, the Baron’s other regiment of riders charged into the rear of the squabbling goblins:



Huzzah! Yet their well executed charge somehow failed to hit home (May have been something to do with Uryens rolling his own dice – he still hasn’t mastered rolling even close to average never mind anything good. One day, I presume, he will cross the fulcrum balancing his life's worth of good and bad luck and thus do marvelously well with his rolls from that point on.) and the goblins not only turned to face them but killed one of the riders! This came as a shock and the riders were pushed back. The goblins took the opportunity to expand their frontage to eight.



Elsewhere, the King’s men rejigged their lines and formations to ready themselves for the fight in the centre of the field. (Note: 2nd movement phase is after combat.)



The wizard Raccaltracc, meanwhile, had ridden to join the white archers nearby, just after they had felled another armoured skeleton. He cast the magical Aura of Steadfastness on them so that they would not fall foul of the fear that had afflicted the blue spearmen.



Those blue spearmen were still fleeing – they would, if they did not halt soon, leave the field of battle altogether.

As the goblin wolf riders continued their idiotic melee, killing another three of their number, the mounted riders managed to hold their own against the goblins this time (This was a draw, so the ‘push back counter’ – as the players came to call it – was reset to zero) The skeleton riders moved closer to the left flank of the archers with Raccaltracc, while the skeleton archers felled a lone green spearman.

Master Hobollig, watching all with interest from his window, and noting the reluctance of most of the foe to close with his warriors, laughed, then calmly cast a wind-blast spell at Baron Clarynn and his riders, which from the way in which they had pushed to the fore seemed to be the only unit that seemed particularly keen to engage in a fight.

End of Turn 5

padre

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2012, 03:45:27 PM »
Turn 6

Having cast the spell ‘Aura of Steadfastness’ on the white-clad archers (actually done at the end of the good guys’ turn 5, but I forgot to write it), the wizard Raccaltracc and the archers wheeled cautiously to their left and let loose a volley at the terrifying skeleton riders mounting the hill beside them. They felled one rider, undoing the magic binding it together, and so sent a scree of bones and ancient armour sliding down the slope. (No missile die modifier for moving and shooting!) Seeing that the loss of one of their number was not going to stop the undead riders, the wizard Raccaltracc summoned up a windblast to prevent their continued advance. The archers cheered at this, suddenly feeling a lot better about their predicament.

Upon the other side of the now windy hill, however, the blue-liveried spearmen were in much worse spirits as they finally left the field of battle altogether. The strange breeze did carry the sound of cheering to them, but it was transformed by their own dark fear into an awful sound. They would not come back.

In the centre of the battlefield the King’s army once again advanced cautiously, moving into positions from which they could launch their charges - that is, should they ever find the courage to do so!



One regiment of spearmen, the men of the King’s Watch, moved more boldly than the rest and thus found themselves somewhat isolated ahead of the main line, heading towards skeleton archers and armoured warriors.



Having noticed the advance of these spearmen, a sight which gave him no small feeling of pride, King Rathard looked instead to his right and saw that he had three regiments of foot poised to attack two of goblins …



… though it annoyed him that the whole battle line was not shifted to the left, for as it was he and his knights were facing a regiment of red cloaked, great-weapon wielding skeletons rather than being able to make a dash for the tower. It also worried him that his wizardly servant Raccaltracc was busied in the rear, when he really ought to be up at the front looking for a way to reach the Tower of Baal himself. After all, it was Raccaltracc who carried the necessary magical potion to destroy the stone within.

Behind the farm the wolf-riding goblins continued their bloody struggle, their champion being wounded as another rider was killed. The plate-armoured goblins in front of the farm also found themselves uncontrollably angry with the spear unit next to them (who had killed several of their number in an earlier struggle) and charged into them – in their hatred they were utterly heedless of the multitude of enemies closing in on them. Perhaps ironically, it was one of their own number who was to die in the ensuing melee.

At least Grom was still thinking about the foe and his orders, so he moved his little guard into the Tower of Baal to set about preparing its defence, should such prove necessary. This pleased Master Hobollig, as did the fact that the goblin regiment on the far left of the field stubbornly held their ground against the mounted men at arms (Another draw). No horsemen were going to outflank his force. Not yet, at least.

Amazed to see that the goblins were fighting each other, the light spearmen decided this was surely the moment for their strike and charged the plate-wearing regiment of goblins before them …



… while the longbowmen off to the side rushed into the farmyard intending (if possible) to use it as a petty fortress from which to shoot at the of from relative safety. Already several of the men at the fore were eyeing up the barn to their left, and wondering how easy it might be to tear through the slate roof.

The King’s Watch spearmen closed that little bit more, having been ordered to draw the foe away from the tower if possible, and bravely trying to do just that. Elsewhere on the field it seemed all the goblins’ internal squabbling had got their blood up, for they now fought ferociously. The regiment tangled with the Baron’s flanking riders brought one of the men own, and in so doing actually pushed the horsemen back! (Note: 2” push back and lapping two goblins around each flank.)



The plate-armoured goblins fared well too, their blades working better against the foe than they had against other goblins. They also pushed the light spearmen back.



The goblin spear warriors by their right reformed to ready themselves to receive a charge from the massive regiment of green and red liveried Baron’s spearmen, keeping themselves neatly aligned with the skeleton regiment further to the right.

Raccaltracc, although beginning to worry concerning his reserves of magical power, once more wind-blasted the skeleton riders, but this time the enchanted wind interfered with the archers’ arrows and they failed to hit a thing.

At the rear of the field, Faddgit (the goblin hero riding a wolf) now decided enough was enough, left the two last wolf-riders hacking away at each other and rode off alone towards the Tower of Baal. He was beginning to wonder if he would get ever be paid by Master Hobollig considering his two companies of wolf riders had done nothing more useful than kill each other! Meanwhile, the spear goblins, now that the other goblins were busy fighting the foe, decided to put their squabbles as side and advanced a little towards the foe, maintaining their alignment with the red-cloaked skeletons.



Now either thrusting all around or slashing furiously with their swords, the Baron’s riders behind the barn began slaying goblins, killing enough to unnerve the greenskins and so push them back. (Back 2” and goblins lose their lapped round guys back to the main body.) In the centre of the battlefield, however, it was the light spearmen who were losing ground, pushed further back by the plate-armoured goblins. (One more push-back and they would rout.)

Only slightly annoyed at the crashing sounds and cursing coming from Grom’s guard in the room below him, Hobollig saw what Raccaltracc was doing and decided two could play that game. Once again he summoned his own windblast and once again he halted the Baron and his riders in their tracks. But he could only stop one regiment, and so it was that King Rathard was able to lead his knights in a charge at the skeleton warriors (No bonus to the Terror test due to Rathard’s low LD stat, but they passed anyway) while the Green Spear regiment hurled themselves into the goblins.



The ensuing fights went in the men’s favour, the knights killing four skeletons, their warhorses trampling another two. The skeletons fell back a little, pushed by the sheer force of the impact. They were not alone, as the goblin spearmen at their side were also pushed back. Perhaps emboldened by the sight of their comrades’ attacks, the light spearmen now found the courage to fight on, and refused to budge back further. (Note: Draw, resetting the ‘push-back’ counter.)

Out on the left, however, something unexpected occurred: the large regiment of King’s Watch spearmen, at last truly seeing the horrible nature of the foe close up, lost all their courage. To a man they dropped their spears and shields and fled from the battlefield as fast as their legs could carry them. (Note: Failed Terror test when within 6” of skeleton archers, the result they rolled = drop everything and run away. Quite a fail!)

While the white class archers shifted their aim from the wind-blasted skeleton riders to Golgfag’s ogres, wounding one, the longbowmen in the farm, occupied the barn and (as the GM agreed was possible) they began smashing the roof open from inside in preparation for shooting again. Raccaltracc, however, now thought it best to conserve what magical reserves he had left, for he would need to cast spells once he entered the tower. Thus the wind whipping at the undead riders began to ebb away.

(Note: It was now the bad guys’ 8th turn, and yet again Damo rolled ok for Instability. That’s eight passes in a row, and all the time Uryens was kinda relying on at least one fail causing upset in the enemy’s lines. Eddie reckoned Damo rolled dice like Tommy played the pinball machine – ‘played by sense of smell’ … or something. Also notice also that I am making pertinent film references here, for Tommy had been around for 9 years by 1984. This is a proper re-enactment I tell ya.)

The last surviving goblin wolf rider now decided to attempt to leap the high gate of the courtyard and attack the longbowmen inside. Unsurprisingly this ambitious intention failed and he ended up in agony below the gate, the wolf having thrown him and ragged him with its teeth for such a stupid action. (Note: Eddie decided that Simon could try this, succeeding on a roll of 12 on a 2D6. If he failed he would receive a strength 3 hit. He did fail. He died. Once again Simon deftly played a daft teenager to a tee. (That sentence was fun to type!))

As the brave goblins at the rear once more held their ground against he mounted men-at-arms (another of many no-score draws), and the plate-armoured goblins did the same against the light spear, the spear goblins were pushed back by the green spearmen and so were the red-cloaked skeletons by King Rathard and his noblemen.

Important Note: It was just this moment, almost 9 turns into the game, that something dawned on all us re-enactors at the table – a very embarrassing ‘slip’. We had been playing 8th ed. style casualty removal – i.e. 2nd rankers step forwards so that the front rank always gets all its attacks. Of course this is not how it was in first edition. Nor, and this is the embarrassing part, did it do so in editions 2 through 7. In other words I had played the old way for about 25 years and here in this game I forgot entirely how it was done. Oops! When we considered what had gone on so far, we decided the results hadn’t been too out of kilter with what we should have done. Annoying, however, as maybe the good guys (with better Initiatives) could have pushed back or routed a goblin regiment back a little bit sooner. Ah well, next time we’ll get it right.

Finally released from the wind, the mounted skeleton champion and his two companions now came charging down the hill into the white archers. Two bowmen fell to the champion’s deadly blade, while one skeleton rider was slain, but because of the steadfast spell still affecting them, the archers refused to run. (Note: Without the spell they would have routed, as you always run when defeated by a fear causing foe!)



Laughing maniacally, and beginning to feel that the battle had become nothing but a game in which to pass the time until darkness fell and the enemy would surely flee in terror, Master Hobollig continued directing his windblast at Baron Clarynn and his riders so that they still could not approach the tower.

Turn 9, Last turn of daylight. After that, only two turns of twilight and then … the long, dark night.

King Rathard’s forces where now either unable or unwilling to move, being in combat with the foe or ensconced just where they wanted to be with their bows. Nine longbowmen could see out of the smashed roof and so began taking pot-shots at the Ogres. Although their aim was off, a better-aimed volley from the other longbowmen on the central hill did fell an ogre.

Even now, after a long and hard fight, the Baron’s riders behind the farm could not push back the goblins (yet another scoreless draw), but in the centre of the field, the fight was going more King Rathard’s way. The light spearmen finally routed the plate-armoured goblins, and so chased after them (their two free blows getting them no kills!) …



… then the King and his knights also routed the skeletons chasing as they fled alongside one of the Tower of Baal’s outbuildings.



(Note: We could find no rule anywhere that said skeletons do not rout after 3 push backs like most troops. Goblins last only 2 turns, Elves and dwarfs longer. But nothing about undead.)

The green spear regiment was not so fortunate, however, and was pushed back yet again by the goblins. So too were the white archers facing the undead rider and champion, but as Raccaltracc was still with them, his Aura of Steadfastness protected them from fear. Not that the wizard intended to stay with them any longer, for he cose now to cast his flight spell, which lifted him and his horse (‘Why not the horse’, said Eddie when Uryens asked) towards the centre of the field.

(Note: No rule about having to stay with a unit if they are in combat, though the wizard was not actually in base to base contact, which made it seem ok to us 2012ers. Very flexible these old rules, eh?)

As soon as the wizard landed, the lone goblin wolf rider champion charged him, though whether it was the wolf who made the decision to do so or the rider no-one could say. (Here you can see the wolf rider doing one of those old Oliver Hardy style glances at the camera as if to say “What?”)



The Baron’s riders at the rear were beginning to tire now, both they and their horses feeling the onset of darkness, and they were finally pushed back again by the goblins. The green clad spearmen managed to hold their ground and not be pushed back again …



… while the white archers also, even with the magical aura lifted from them, somehow found the courage to fight on some more.



Baron Clarynn, his regiment’s ranks thinned by the enemy’s archery, and still held by the windblast, could only watch as a large regiment of armoured skeletons approached him.



King Rathard now knew the battle was surely lost: Raccaltrac was trading blows with a wolf-rider and the Baron was blocked, leaving only him and his knights free to try to take the Tower; but Golgfag and his Ogres stood menacingly before Baal, and inside were Grom’s guard.


(Actually Grom had popped out for a pee just at that moment – you can see him by the side door.)

But the final nail in the coffin, the straw that broke the camel’s back, the last straw, etc and what not, was that darkness was now falling, and what little illumination the twilight offered would soon be snuffed out entirely. There simply was not enough time to get into the tower now (Note: only with two turns of Twilight left), even if the monstrous guards could be overcome.

With an exasperated cry, King Rathard turned to his noblemen. Remembering the words from an enjoyable book he had read recently he shouted:

“Gentlemen, the day is lost. This is not our time. To stay here would be folly. Disperse, I command you, and order the retreat of my army. Save all you can, and save yourselves. For you have done me proud this day, and I will never forget …

But his knights had already gone. And within moments, everyone was running.

“Oh,” said the King.

Game conceded at end of turn 9, with only two turns of Twilight left. Everyone assumed that Baal would become bonkers at night if master Hobollig was still in possession.

…………….

Game over. A ‘smashing’ foray into the world of Warhammer past. Thanks go out to Ant ('Uryens'), Damo (Damien) and Simon (Simon). You all played your parts so well I could almost swear you never grew up.

I might do this again in another 28 years time. What do you think?

Ant

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #28 on: October 04, 2012, 04:02:05 PM »
It was huge amounts of fun, 3rd ed reenactment next!
And I stil maintain I'd rather play 1st ed than 8th!

Simon

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Re: Reenactment of 1984 Warhammer Battle Game
« Reply #29 on: October 05, 2012, 09:14:24 AM »
I liked Ant's idea of reenacting the reenactment with 3rd ed rules. (which ed do all his archers get to fire in two ranks?)
CHARISMA SEVEN!!